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Table Of Contents  How to Build Your Own PC - Save A Buck And Learn A Lot
 9  Chapter 3: Installing the CPU, Heatsink, and RAM On The Mainboard
      9  Installing the CPU Into Its Socket

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Installing the CPU Into Its Socket
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Opening and Examining the CPU Socket
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Preparing the Mainboard for the CPU

Remove the mainboard from its box and static-proof bag. Before touching the mainboard touch both of your hands to a piece of metal (the PC case) to draw off any static electricity that might be present on your hands.

In addition, you might want to wear a wrist grounding strap, with its clip attached to a grounded metal object. Keep the strap tight to your wrist and clip it to a metal ground. Usually, the metal ground is the power supply attached to the PC case. Some argue that the heavy paint on a PC case can prevent proper grounding, so clipping it to the power supply is usually recommended. This should keep any static charge from accumulating on your hands.

As with all circuit boards, try to handle the mainboard only by the corners to minimize the chances of undesirable static shock being transferred to the components. Try to avoid touching components on the mainboard, unless necessary. Also, try to avoid touching the bottom of the mainboard. You can usually handle a mainboard by its edges and corners.

Place the mainboard on a sturdy, clean surface. Don’t place the mainboard on a dirty surface or on a surface that will encourage the mainboard to pick up lint, such as a towel or bedsheet. Plus, those surfaces are very bad, because they encourage the build-up of static electricity. Either a clean table or the top of the box the mainboard came in should work well. The mainboard pictured is sitting on a large sheet of clean paper.

 

Those who build many PCs can purchase grounded mats. As with everything else, it’s good to prepare your work surface before you begin. Some builders suggest using a plant sprayer to mist some water into the room before you start working, because humidity reduces the chances of static discharge. If you do this, don’t mist the mainboard itself or any PC parts!


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Installing the CPU Into Its Socket
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Opening and Examining the CPU Socket
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How to Build Your Own PC (http://www.PCGuide.com/byop/) on PCGuide.com
Version 1.0 - Version Date: May 4, 2005

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